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SE07 - The crucial balance of NO signalling - from Synapse to Disease (09:00-20:00)

This Symposium has been organised to bring together researchers from world-leading laboratories studying the elusive roles of NO signalling in the brain and will focus on physiological and pathological effects of this so-called Janus molecule.

Start

July 8, 2022 - 9:00 am

End

July 8, 2022 - 8:00 pm

Address

Sorbonne University Institut de la Vision Paris   View map

Nitric Oxide (NO) is a signalling molecule to modulate neuronal function, promote survival and differentiation of neural cells and exerts long-lasting effects through regulation of transcription factors and modulation of gene expression. NOis produced in neurons in response to enhanced activity and often increased in response to stress and under neurodegenerative conditions.
Most of NO’s signalling is carried out by the redox nature of the molecule itself and its metabolites, known as reactive nitrogen species (RNS), to target and modify critical cysteine residues in proteins, which includes S-nitrosylation and S-oxidation, as well as by nitration (3-Nitrotyrosination). In particular, the latter two pathways are involved in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration such as in Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson disease and Huntington disease.
The symposium will present research on the neurovascular function of NO, specific ion channel targets associated with the canonical cGMP pathway. The main theme is to illustrate translational approaches targeting diverse nitrergic signalling in neuropathologies such as Alzheimer’s and autism spectrum disorders.
This Symposium has been organised to bring together researchers from world-leading laboratories studying the elusive roles of NO signalling in the brain and will focus on physiological and pathological effects of this so-called Janus molecule.
Over recent years, research targeting nitrergic signalling to study its role in physiology and disease has progressed substantially and is timely to present and discuss those recent findings.